Heal Yourself At Home
DIY SOLUTIONS FOR YOUR HEALTH
side bar
GSE Bruises and Contusions (Bruised bones) Treatments

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS)

About

Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when muscles and tendons in the hand put pressure on the median nerve in the wrist  - causing pain, tingling, numbness and/or weakness in the hand.

The median nerve - runs from the forearm to the hand through a small space in your wrist called the carpal tunnel;  It controls movement of the thumb and adjacent 3 fingers, but not the little finger. 

The carpal tunnel - is a passageway located on the palm side of the wrist connecting the forearm to the hand. The flexor retinaculum is a fibrous ligament covering the carpal bones and forming the carpal tunnel together with the arched carpal bones of the wrist. Nine tendons connected to the flexor muscles of the forearm pass through the carpal tunnel and if any of these tendons swell or degenerate,  they can "pinch" the median nerve causing pain.

By OpenStax College - Anatomy & Physiology, Connexions Web site. http://cnx.org/content/col11496/1.6/, Jun 19, 2013., CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30131518

 

Symptoms

✔  Pain, tingling, numbness, and/or weakness in the hand - with pain sometimes radiating into forearm and shoulder

✔  Symptoms in thumb, pointy finger, middle finger and thumb side of ring finger,  but NOT the little finger

✔  Pain often more pronounced at night

✔  Temporary relief by shaking the hand

Causes

Anything causing swelling that makes the carpal tunnel smaller - including:

✔    Making repetitive movements with the hand or wrist - especially if the hand is bent downwards (i.e. lower than the wrist). Such activities include excessive /prolonged keyboarding, clicking a mouse button, excessive use of pruning shears, repetitively lifting heavy weights, scrubbing, using vibrating hand tools, twisting a screwdriver

✔   Inflammatory conditions / illnesses - such as pregnancy, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes,  hypothyroidism, gout

A Harvard study suggests that there may be a genetic disposition to CTS

DISCLAIMER: The content on this website is intended for informational, and educational purposes only and not as a substitute for the medical advice, treatment or diagnosis of a licensed health professional. The author of this website is a researcher, not a health professional, and shall in no event be held liable to any party for any direct, indirect, special, incidental, punitive or other damages arising from any use of the content of this website. Any references to health benefits of specifically named products on this site are this website author's sole opinion and are not approved or supported by their manufacturers or distributors. COPYRIGHT 2009-2017