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DIY SOLUTIONS FOR YOUR HEALTH
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GSE Health-beneficial dairy choices

DAIRY – “Got Good Milk?”

 ". . . a land that floweth with MILK and honey"

There are 3 main considerations when it comes to buying milk or products made from milk – for the most healthful nutrients, milk should ideally be:

 

(1) Raw (unpasteurized)

i.e. Not Processed

(2) Organic

(3) From Grass (or hay) - fed cows/goats/sheep

i.e. Not GRAIN-fed animals

The Best Choice is Whole, RAW Milk (or its products) from animals eating ORGANICALLY-grown GRASS, not given synthetic growth hormones or regular antibiotic treatments to increase milk production

(1) Choose raw milk if you can find it

Is raw milk safe?

Raw milk kills pathogens

Locate a raw milk source near you at Campaign for Real Milk.

Alternatively, use an organic, grass-fed, minimally processed pasteurized milk source

Best choice of pasteurized milk

(Not yet available)

Raw cheeses are sold in some U.S. stores -  but you have to look for them (many are imported E.g. French Comté cheese is currently sold at Costco's Sep. 2017)

(2) Choose Organic Dairy Products

An organic dairy product means that:

–   The diet of the cows (or other dairy animals) is free of pesticides, herbicides and genetically modified food;

–    The animals are not routinely treated with antibiotics or injected with synthetic hormones - E.g. rBGH to increase milk production

GM Foods – How to avoid Genetically Modified Foods

NON-organic butter is particularly high in pesticides - having up to 20 times as many pesticides as non-organic vegetables. NON-organic milk contains fewer chemicals than butter because it is nowhere near as concentrated. Also, pasteurization usually causes far more problems than its chemical content.

Butter

Ghee Keeps Without Refrigeration

AND has less pesticides

Made by gently heating butter to cause the water to boil off and the protein milk solids to settle to the bottom. The cooked and clarified butter fat is then strained from the milk solids.

DIRECTIONS:

(1) Use 1/2-1 pound of unsalted butter

(2) Simmer on low for a minimum of 20 minutes, allowing the water to evaporate and the fat to separate.

(3) Allow unsalted butter to cool for 5-30 minutes.

(4) Strain mixture through cheese cloth, or a mesh screen.

(5) Place strained butter (ghee) in a glass jar.

Choose dairy products from rBGH-free cows - rBGH (Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone, also called rBST (Recombinant SOMATOtropin), sold as Posilac® (Monsanto sold this product to the pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly in 2008) is a synthetic, genetically modifed version of natural BGH / BST (a growth hormone, primarily released by a cow's pituitary gland; BGH regulates somatic growth and influences a cow's milk production). rBGH is injected into dairy cows to artificially force a>10% increase in milk production.

–   rBGH causes health problems/pain in cows - The E.U. Scientific Committee on Animal Health and Animal Welfare stated that rBST used in dairy cows produces reproductive disorders and substantially increases foot problems, mastitis and injection site reactions, painful and debilitating to the cows.

–   rBGH is significantly correlated with increased cancer risk - rBGH milk contains higher levels of PUS, bacteria, and antibiotics, and substantially higher amounts of a potent cancer tumor promoter, called IGF-1.

The sale of Posilac® (rBGH) is illegal in virtually every developed country, except the U.S.!

(3) Choose Dairy Products from Grass-fed cows

Grass fed cows produce milk that is nutritionally superior to grain-fed cows:

–   Contains an impressive amino acid and immuno-supportive nutrient profile;

–   Rich in healthy fats lipolic acid and CLA (conjugated linoleic acid)

Brands of ORGANIC Milk from:

 NOT grass-fed: Horizon® and Aurora® (currently sold at Costco, Target, Safeway and under Walmart's private label Great Value®).

 MAINLY grass-fed cows - include Natural by Nature® and Organic Valley®.

ONLY grass-fed - Organic Valley® sells a milk called "Grassmilk", from cows that ate ONLY organic grass. Unfortunately, it is ultra-pasteurized and quite expensive at its current price of $5.99 / half gallon (Publix supermarket, FL 2017).

 

Other “moo-velous” milk-related information

Cultured / Fermented milk products - skimmed or partially skimmed milk is soured by introducing a culture of lactic acid-producing bacteria and/or yeast. Dating back to around 10,000 B.C., this process extends the short "shelf-life" of milk, adds nutrients, especially probiotics, and enhances digestibility. In addition to cow and goat milk, non-dairy milks can also be cultured, including coconut, soy, and almond milk.

-   Yogurt - primarily cultured from cow's milk, and by definition must contain Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus

-   Kefir - described as  "drinkable yogurt", it is made by introducing so-called kefir grains (small, spongy, symbiotic colonies of ~20% beneficial yeast and ~80% bacteria) into milk. Kefir has a high probiotic content (E.g. 10-20 billion CFU / 8 oz in Lifeway brand, but has high sugar content);

Food sources of probiotics

-   Cheese - a variety of over 2,000 hard and soft cheese are made using different levels and steps in the fermentation process, often named by their original place of production. Best choice is naturally fermented (E.g. made by simply straining the moisture from sour cream or yogurt), raw milk cheeses (Still made in France, England, Switzerland and Greece from whole milk from pasture-fed cows). Look for words "milk" or "fresh milk" rather than "pasteurized milk" on the label. To name just a few: cream cheese, feta, Cheddar, blue,  Gruyere, Wensleydale, and goat.

-   Sour Cream / Craime fraîche - cream soured with a bacterial culture. Compared to sour cream, craime fraîche is less tangy and has a higher fat content  (30% compared to 20% - curdles less in simmering soups or sauces) and being naturally thick, it does not contain added thickeners.

-   Buttermilk / clabbered milk - traditional buttermilk is the liquid left after churning butter or is the result of leaving fresh, unrefrigerated milk to be fermented naturally by its inherent wild-bacteria (called clabbered milk). Today buttermilk is typically cultured milk. Buttermilk tastes tart and is thicker than plain milk. Its acidity is utilized to make soda bread and marinate/tenderize meat.

 

Butter – churned from cream; raw is preferred, otherwise choose organic butter from cows fed fast-growing grass (E.g. from Ireland, Denmark or New Zealand):

Butter

Cream – raw is preferred, otherwise pasteurized (e.g. Butterworks®). Add cream liberally to soups, drinks, desserts to enhance body's utilization of water-soluble vitamins;

Creamiest Milk - Guernsey and Jersey cow milk is the creamiest.

Add Sulfurated protein (E.g. cottage cheese, ricotta, yogurt) to fresh flax seed oil - Sulfurated protein mixed with flax oil makes the oil water-soluble and enhances utilization of its Omega-3 fat content.

–   Choose Full or Low-fat (not no-fat) Cottage Cheese, Ricotta Cheese or Yogurt (Plain,without added sugar, with active cultures)

Dried Milk - “A recipe for heart disease” - since it contains artery-damaging oxidized (i.e. damaged) cholesterol. It is an ingredient in many products, such as low-fat cheese, cake mixes, cocoa mixes, candy bars, some baked goods.

Dried milk is usually added to low fat, 1% and 2% milk to improve flavor

Freezing Milk - does not affect its nutritional value short-term, but does affect its consistency.

Use milk within 2 days once opened - Once opened, bacteria accumulate quickly in plastic bottles, so drink the entire bottle within a day or two.

DISCLAIMER: The content on this website is intended for informational, and educational purposes only and not as a substitute for the medical advice, treatment or diagnosis of a licensed health professional. The author of this website is a researcher, not a health professional, and shall in no event be held liable to any party for any direct, indirect, special, incidental, punitive or other damages arising from any use of the content of this website. Any references to health benefits of specifically named products on this site are this website author's sole opinion and are not approved or supported by their manufacturers or distributors. COPYRIGHT 2009-2017